United States Lamb Imports

In the United States, 99% of lamb imports come from Australia and New Zealand. Since 2000, almost 62% of lamb imports were from Australia and 38% from New Zealand. Between 1998 and 2002, smaller volumes of lamb and mutton came from Canada, Uruguay, Nicaragua, Ukraine, and Iceland.

Imports from Australia and New Zealand primarily coincide with seasonal high production periods in the United States namely, during the Easter holidays around March and April. Most imported lamb comes in the form of fresh or chilled meat and a smaller percentage is imported frozen.

Lamb and mutton imports by volume from Australia were 31,569 metric tons (MT) in 1998, 32,201 MT in 1999, 38,727 MT in 2000, 43,995 MT in 2001, and 45,810 MT in 2002. Between January and August 2003, the total volume of lamb imports from Australia was 27,099 MT.

Lamb and mutton imports by value from Australia were $86.66 million in 1998, $95.66 million in 1999,

Other

Other

Fig. 1 Share of international fresh sheep meat exports by volume in 2001. (From United Nations, Food and Agricultural Organization, FAOSTATS, http://apps.fao.org/page/collections? subset=agriculture, accessed November 2003.) (View this art in color at www.dekker.com.)

Fig. 1 Share of international fresh sheep meat exports by volume in 2001. (From United Nations, Food and Agricultural Organization, FAOSTATS, http://apps.fao.org/page/collections? subset=agriculture, accessed November 2003.) (View this art in color at www.dekker.com.)

$108.81 million in 2000, $139.47 million in 2001, and $152.56 million in 2002. Between January and August 2003, the total value of lamb imports from Australia was $120.69 million.

Lamb and mutton imports by volume from New Zealand were 15,354.30 MT in 1998, 14,451 in 1999, 14,980 MT in 2000, 16,660 MT in 2001, and 20,899 MT in

2002. Between January and August 2003, the total volume of lamb imports from New Zealand was 17,201 MT.

Lamb and mutton imports by value from New Zealand were $72.94 million in 1998, $77.66 million in 1999, $80.98 million in 2000, $88.57 million in 2001, and 109.67 million in 2002. Between January and August

2003, the total value of lamb imports from New Zealand was $86.83 million.

During the 1990s, lamb imports to the United States increased in volume at a rate of nearly 13% per year[2] (Fig. 2). Between 2000 and 2001, imports increased 14.42%.[2] In the ten years 1992 2001, total imported lamb volumes increased 248%, from 31 million pounds to a little over 108 million pounds.[2] From 1992 to 2001, Australian imports increased in volume by 353%.[2] In the same period, New Zealand imports increased in volume by 216%.[2]

Favorable exchange rates coupled with strong demand can strengthen trade flows. For much of the 1990s and early 2000s, the U.S. dollar strengthened, thereby making imports to the United States relatively less expensive (Fig. 3). During this period, lamb imports increased dramatically as the U.S. market became relatively more profitable. From a four-year high in November 1996 to a three-year low in April 2001, the U.S. dollar fell by 37% against the Australian dollar, from $0.79 USD/AUD to $0.50 USD/AUD. During this period the U.S./New Zealand exchange rate fell from $0.71 USD/NZD to $0.41 USD/NZD.[3]

From mid-2001 through October 2003, the U.S. exchange rate weakened against the Australian dollar and the New Zealand dollar, making U.S. imports relatively more expensive. In January 2003, the U.S./ Australian exchange rate was an average $0.58 USD/ AUD, but weakened to $0.69 USD/AUD in October.[3] In January 2003, the U.S./New Zealand exchange rate was an average $0.54 USD/NZD, but weakened to $0.60 USD/ NZD in October.[3]

How To Bolster Your Immune System

How To Bolster Your Immune System

All Natural Immune Boosters Proven To Fight Infection, Disease And More. Discover A Natural, Safe Effective Way To Boost Your Immune System Using Ingredients From Your Kitchen Cupboard. The only common sense, no holds barred guide to hit the market today no gimmicks, no pills, just old fashioned common sense remedies to cure colds, influenza, viral infections and more.

Get My Free Audio Book


Post a comment