Balloon Dilatation and Stenting

The treatment-type double-balloon endoscope (EN-450T5) has the same working length (200 cm) as the observation type (EN-450P5/20) but a larger forceps channel of 2.8 mm; it therefore allows interventions with an endoscopic balloon dilator, as performed with the conventional endoscope (Fig. 11.4.1). However, it can be used not only for balloon dilatation but also for hemostasis by clipping or APC. In contrast, the observation-type double-balloon endoscope (EN-450P5/20) has a narrow forceps channel of 2.2 mm, and a balloon dilator for the conventional endoscope therefore cannot be inserted through the forceps channel. After advancing the endoscope to the affected region, however, one can perform interventions under fluoroscopic guidance by withdrawing the endoscope and leaving the balloon-attached overtube (internal diameter 10 mm, total length 145 cm) (hereafter referred to as the overtube) in the intestine, thereby establishing a short, straightened route to the affected region. In addition, the "endoscope removal method" unique to double-balloon endoscopy may even be applied to place a stent in the small intestine. This subsection details the endoscopic treatment of stenosis of the small intestine.

Single Balloon Overtube

Fig. 11.4.1. Balloon dilatation with the treatment-type double-balloon endoscope (EN-450T5)

A Stenosis of the small intestine associated with Crohn's disease B Balloon dilatation while monitoring the stenotic site through the balloon C Stenotic site after dilatation

Fig. 11.4.1. Balloon dilatation with the treatment-type double-balloon endoscope (EN-450T5)

A Stenosis of the small intestine associated with Crohn's disease B Balloon dilatation while monitoring the stenotic site through the balloon C Stenotic site after dilatation

0 0

Post a comment