Electron Microscopy

The typical ultrastructural finding is immune complex-type electron-dense deposits in the mesangium (Figs. 6.5 and 6.6). Dense deposits most often are found immediately beneath the paramesangial glomerular basement membrane. The amount of deposits varies substantially, with occasional specimens having massive replacement of the matrix by the dense material (Fig. 6.6). Rare specimens that have well-defined IgA deposits by immunofluorescence microscopy do not have detectable mesangial dense deposits, which does not rule out a diagnosis of IgA nephropathy because the

Meningioma Cell Line Picture
Figure 6.5. Electron micrograph of a glomerulus from a patient with IgA nephropathy showing a moderate amount of electron-dense deposits within the mesangium. The mesangium is on the left of the image and a portion of the capillary loop is on the right.
Figure 6.6. Electron micrograph of a glomerulus from a patient with IgA nephropathy showing massive electron-dense deposits within the mesangium. The mesan-gium is on the left of the image and a portion of the capillary loop is on the right.

immunohistology is the defining feature. Capillary wall subepithelial, sub-endothelial, and intramembranous deposits are identified in approximately a quarter to a third of specimens with IgA nephropathy (3), and are more frequent in patients with Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis (10). Capillary wall deposits are least frequent in histologically mild disease and most frequent in histologically severe disease, especially when crescents are present.

Focal areas of glomerular basement membrane thinning are observed in many specimens with IgA nephropathy (14). This structural abnormality may contribute to the hematuria. Focal or diffuse podocyte foot process effacement often is present, especially in patients with nephrotic range proteinuria. Foot process effacement is particularly prominent in patients who have the syndrome of histologically mild IgA nephropathy with minimal change glomerulopathy-like features clinically (15). Mesangial matrix expansion and mesangial hypercellularity parallel the mesangial changes seen by light microscopy.

Diabetes 2

Diabetes 2

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin a hormone made by the pancreas to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use. Learn more...

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