Cerebral veins

The vast majority of venous drainage of the brain is through the sagittal sinuses (Figs 21.4 and 21.5: the superior, and the straight which is the continuation of the inferior) which

Parietal

Frontal branch branch

Precentral sulcus

Superior frontal sulcus

Central branch

Inferior frontal sulcus

Parietal

Frontal branch branch

Central branch

Precentral sulcus

Superior frontal sulcus

Inferior frontal sulcus

Parietotemporal branch

Parieto-occipital sulcus

Frontal branch

Posterior ramus of lateral sulcus

Temporal branches

Parietotemporal branch

Parieto-occipital sulcus

Frontal branch

Posterior ramus of lateral sulcus

Temporal branches

Frontal branch

Frontoparietal branch

Corpus callosum

Frontal branch

Frontoparietal branch

Corpus callosum

Parietal branch

Parieto-occipital branch

Occipital branch

Orbital branches

Anterior cerebral Posterior Temporal artery cerebral branches artery

Orbital branches

Parietal branch

Parieto-occipital branch

Anterior cerebral Posterior Temporal artery cerebral branches artery

Occipital branch

Figure 21.3. (a) Arteries of the superolateral surface of the left cerebral hemisphere and (b) of the medial and tentorial surfaces.

Superior cerebral vein

Superior anastomotic vein Superior sagittal sinus

Superficial middle cerebral vein

Superior cerebral vein

Superficial middle cerebral vein

Inferior cerebral vein

Transverse sinus

Sigmoid sinus

Inferior cerebral vein

Transverse sinus

Sigmoid sinus

Intercavernous sinus

Sphenoparietal sinus

Superior petrosal

Occipital sinus

Intercavernous sinus

Sphenoparietal sinus

Superior petrosal

Occipital sinus

Inferior petrosal

Spinal medulla

Transverse sinus

Superior sagittal sinus

Figure 21.5. Floor of the cranial cavity, illustrating the main venous sinuses.

Inferior petrosal

Spinal medulla

Transverse sinus

Figure 21.4. Veins of the superolateral surface of the hemisphere.

Superior sagittal sinus

Figure 21.5. Floor of the cranial cavity, illustrating the main venous sinuses.

join together at the confluence of sinuses inside the inion. There the lateral sinuses are formed which run around the posterior fossa to become the sigmoid sinuses which become the internal jugular veins to leave the skull and run through the neck in the carotid sheath. There are no valves in the sinuses.

There is no lymphatic drainage of the brain, although the scalp and face do have lymphatic drainage initially to superficial lymph glands (parotid, mastoid, submental, and occipital) and thence into the deep cervical glands.

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