Variability in estimated METs

Ainsworth, et al. (1993) have compiled an extensive compendium on the estimated MET values for a variety of physical activities. It is important to recognise that these values are estimates, which means that each individual patient could be working above or below this estimate. The variability of the estimate depends on the simplicity or complexity of the movements. For example, the variability of pedalling an exercise cycle ergometer will likely be less than that of stepping or walking. The...

References

American College of Sports Medicine (2000) Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription, 6th edn. Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, MD. Armstrong, G., Dunn, M., Bredin, Y., McCuskey,F., Brown, C. (2004) Patients' Views on Community Cardiac Rehabilitation. Proceedings of the British Association for Cardiac Rehabilitation Conference. Beswick, A.D., Rees, K., Griebsch, I., Taylor, F.C., Burke, M., West, R.R., et al. (2004) Provision, uptake and cost of cardiac rehabilitation...

B

Need a much more defined interval approach than will fitter participants (see rationale for interval training p. 135). Active recovery stations should last for no more than one minute. The time between consecutive stations should be kept to a minimum, and, as a guide, should only last long enough for participants to walk from one station to the next. Different ways of controlling the circuit time and movement are discussed later in this chapter. Figure 5.5. Concentric circles circuit. Figure...

Relapse prevention model

Relapse is a breakdown or setback in a person's attempt to change or modify target behaviour. The relapse prevention model was developed to treat addictive behaviours, such as alcoholism and smoking (Marlatt and Gordon, 1985). The model proposes that relapse may result from an individual's inability to cope with situations that pose a risk of return to the previous behaviour. For example, a former smoker finds himself or herself in a social situation with lots of smokers and is tempted to...

Heart rate response during intervaltype exercise

Interval circuit exercise is specifically beneficial to individuals with low functional capacity, left ventricular dysfunction or concomitant pulmonary or peripheral circulatory disease exercise limitations (Cachovan, et al., 1976 Maass, et al., 1983 Meyer, et al., 1990 Cooper, 2001). The use of interval circuit exercise is a typical feature in the UK for phase III and IV rehabilitation programmes. Interval training permits the patient to produce a greater amount of work in a training session...

Rationale for interval training

The premise of interval training is that an individual can produce a greater amount of work in a training session if the training bouts are spaced between periods of lower intensity work. Usually these active recovery (AR) periods are between 30 seconds and one minute in duration (see Chapter 4). Key Points on Active Recovery Exercises lower intensity cardiovascular activity, e.g. walking musculoskeletal endurance (MSE) work, e.g. exercises to improve local endurance of muscles NOT used in the...

Measurement of functional capacity

Exercise tolerance testing ETT , or field tests of functional capacity, can produce an estimated METs value to guide risk stratification and exercise prescription. True values can only be obtained through cardio-pulmonary exercise testing using gas analysis. Predicted VO2max or extrapolated MET values have a degree of error, as compared to true VO2max when measured using gas analysis. Factors Influencing Accuracy in Clinical Practice METs or Vo2max peak The use of a sub-maximal symptom limited...

The physiological rationale for using heart rate

In healthy individuals and cardiac patients, the common aim of using heart rate is to act as a marker of the physiological strain of the exercising skeletal muscles. Specific to the cardiac patient, the role of heart rate in conjunction with systolic blood pressure also acts as a key indicator of myocardial strain Froelicher and Myers, 2000 . As a marker of the body's general physiological strain during aerobic exercise, heart rate is usually described as a percentage of maximal heart rate...