Empirical Evidence For Cbt For Adhd

Overall, the empirical literature on psychosocial treatments for adults with ADHD is sparse. CBT approaches have offered some encouraging preliminary results. Wilens et al. (1999) performed a chart review of 26 adults seeking treatment for ADHD. Clinical data were collected at baseline, at the point of medication stabilization, and at the end of CBT (introduced after medication stabilization). The findings indicated that CBT was associated with patient improvements on a measure of depression, on clinician ratings of anxiety and improvements on ADHD symptoms, and on a rating of overall functioning, both when comparing the overall effects of the combination of CBT and meds, and when assessing the effects of CBT after medication stabilization.

Rostain and Ramsay (2003) conducted a prospective pilot study of a treatment approach combining pharmacotherapy and CBT for 45 adults diagnosed with ADHD. Clinical data were gathered at initial assessment and at the end of approximately 16 sessions of CBT. The results indicated that the combined treatment was associated with statistically significant improvements on measures of depression, anxiety, hopelessness, ADHD symptoms, and clinician ratings of ADHD symptoms and overall functioning. A drawback of both studies is that it is difficult to tease apart the relative contributions of CBT and pharmacother-apy. However, anecdotal reports from patients indicate that CBT offers a valuable psychosocial component in their efforts to manage ADHD.

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