Intestinal Duplication

The cystic structure of an intestinal duplication (also called "enteric cyst" or "enterogenous cyst") may, but usually does not, communicate with the adjacent intestinal lumen. The muscular coats of the duplication are intimately adherent to and, at times, are microscopically an integral part of the muscularis of the alimentary tract. Ladd and Gross14 noted that it arises most often in relationship to the ileum and typically from its mesenteric border. Symptomatology in children includes obstruction, pain, and hemorrhage because of interference with the intestinal blood supply, leading to sloughing of the ileal mucosa. Complete extirpation of the mass along with resection of the adjacent portion of the intestine is thus necessary.

Colon Duplication Cyst

Fig. 14—24. Scleroderma with multiple sacculations.

Small bowel series demonstrates jejunal dilatation, compact apposition of normal-sized folds, and multiple wide-mouthed saccula-tions arising from the antimesen-teric border (arrows). (Reproduced from Herlinger and Maglinte.12)

Fig. 14—24. Scleroderma with multiple sacculations.

Small bowel series demonstrates jejunal dilatation, compact apposition of normal-sized folds, and multiple wide-mouthed saccula-tions arising from the antimesen-teric border (arrows). (Reproduced from Herlinger and Maglinte.12)

With an understanding of the radiologic identification of the mesenteric and antimesenteric borders of small bowel loops, barium contrast studies may be of considerable help in the diagnosis. A noncommunicat-ing intestinal duplication may be revealed as an extrinsic soft-tissue mass displacing an ileal loop upon its mes-enteric margin. This precise localization may be seen in 60% of cases.2 The lumen of a communicating duplication may be opacified to clearly demonstrate it as a tubular or spherical structure, specifically arising in relationship to the mesenteric border (Fig. 14-25).

Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

This ebook provides an introductory explanation of the workings of the human body, with an effort to draw connections between the body systems and explain their interdependencies. A framework for the book is homeostasis and how the body maintains balance within each system. This is intended as a first introduction to physiology for a college-level course.

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