Preduodenal Portal Vein

Preduodenal portal vein consists of the persistence of a preduodenal vitelline communicating vein (a caudal in-

Choledochocele

Fig. 2-33. Choledochocele.

ERCP shows that the common bile duct terminates in a localized saccule pouting into the descending duodenum. Note fusiform dilatation of the left hepatic duct.

Fig. 2-33. Choledochocele.

ERCP shows that the common bile duct terminates in a localized saccule pouting into the descending duodenum. Note fusiform dilatation of the left hepatic duct.

Preduodenal Portal VeinLap Bowel Grasper

Fig. 2-34. Choledochocele.

Intraoperative cholangiogram demonstrates a large saccular collection of contrast bulging into the transverse duodenum.

Fig. 2-34. Choledochocele.

Intraoperative cholangiogram demonstrates a large saccular collection of contrast bulging into the transverse duodenum.

Fig. 2-35. Recurrent gallstones formation within a diverticulum of the right hepatic duct and cholangitis in a 71-year-old male.

(a) A cholangiogram taken during cholecystectomy reveals a diverticulum originating from the right hepatic duct (curved arrows). Filling defects represent gallstones within it.

(b) After removal of gallstones within the diverticulum, the patient had recurrent episodes of cholangitis. CT shows thickening of the diverticulum with septation (arrows) with recurrent gallstones (not shown).

(Courtesy of Kimihiro Nakashima, M.D.)

SINUS \ VENOSUS

Week Old Embryo

Fig. 2-36. Schematic diagram of a 4-week old embryo as seen from the front shows the paired right (RVV) and left (LVV) vitelline veins forming a plexus about the duodenum (DUOD). More laterally, the right (RUV) and left (LUV) umbilical veins can be seen coursing toward the sinus venosus. The developing liver bud can be seen projecting from the duodenum (distal foregut).

Fig. 2-36. Schematic diagram of a 4-week old embryo as seen from the front shows the paired right (RVV) and left (LVV) vitelline veins forming a plexus about the duodenum (DUOD). More laterally, the right (RUV) and left (LUV) umbilical veins can be seen coursing toward the sinus venosus. The developing liver bud can be seen projecting from the duodenum (distal foregut).

Hallux Valgus Deformity

Fig. 2-37. Schematic diagram of a 3-month fetus as seen from the front shows the development of the ductus venosus (DV) from the left portal vein. The persistent connection between the left portal vein and the hepatic sinusoids (Hep Sin) is also evident. The plexus of veins around the duodenum (DUOD) has given rise to the splenic and superior mesenteric veins (SMV) draining into the portal vein derived from the right vitelline vein. The latter also has given rise to the hepatic veins.

Fig. 2-37. Schematic diagram of a 3-month fetus as seen from the front shows the development of the ductus venosus (DV) from the left portal vein. The persistent connection between the left portal vein and the hepatic sinusoids (Hep Sin) is also evident. The plexus of veins around the duodenum (DUOD) has given rise to the splenic and superior mesenteric veins (SMV) draining into the portal vein derived from the right vitelline vein. The latter also has given rise to the hepatic veins.

Preduodenal Portal Vein

Fig. 2-38. Umbilical vein within ligamentum teres.

Transverse duplex Doppler sonogram in a normal adult shows the ligamentum teres fissure (arrow) separating the lateral (L) and medial (M) segments of the left hepatic lobe. Note hepatopedal flow (below the Doppler baseline) in a persistently patent umbilical vein.

Fig. 2-38. Umbilical vein within ligamentum teres.

Transverse duplex Doppler sonogram in a normal adult shows the ligamentum teres fissure (arrow) separating the lateral (L) and medial (M) segments of the left hepatic lobe. Note hepatopedal flow (below the Doppler baseline) in a persistently patent umbilical vein.

Patent Ductus Venosus Ultrasound

Fig. 2-39. Portohepatic venous shunt.

Longitudinal color Doppler sonogram (depicted in gray scale) of the liver shows the portal (straight arrow) and hepatic (curved arrow) venous limbs of a congenital portohepatic venous shunt.

Fig. 2-39. Portohepatic venous shunt.

Longitudinal color Doppler sonogram (depicted in gray scale) of the liver shows the portal (straight arrow) and hepatic (curved arrow) venous limbs of a congenital portohepatic venous shunt.

Radiology Ultrasound Hepatic Vein

Fig. 2-40. Intrahepatic portal-hepatic venous shunt.

A 32-year-old woman was admitted because of altered mental status with vague physical symptoms for a few years. (a and b) A large shunt (arrows) between the posterior branch of the right portal vein (P) and an enlarged right hepatic vein (RH) was discovered and confirmed by ultrasound (color Doppler ultrasonography, transverse scans, depicted in gray scale). (c) Angiography with the catheter tip placed in the portal vein demonstrates a large shunt (arrows) between the right portal vein and enlarged right hepatic vein (RH).

Preduodenal Portal Vein
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tervitelline anastomosis.73 Most patients with preduo-denal portal vein have been reported to present with duodenal stenosis or intestinal obstruction in childhood. Other associated anomalies include polysplenia, annular pancreas, biliary atresia, duplicated or interrupted inferior vena cava, intestinal malrotation, and pancreatic abnormalities.74 For asymptomatic patients, the correct imaging diagnosis of a preduodenal portal vein before abdominal surgery or laparoscopic procedures may prevent accidental injury to this vessel (Fig. 2-41).

Get Rid of Gallstones Naturally

Get Rid of Gallstones Naturally

One of the main home remedies that you need to follow to prevent gallstones is a healthy lifestyle. You need to maintain a healthy body weight to prevent gallstones. The following are the best home remedies that will help you to treat and prevent gallstones.

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