Chapter References

The Revised Authoritative Guide To Vaccine Legal Exemptions

Vaccines Have Serious Side Effects

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31. Collins CL, Mullan RJ, Moseley RR: HIV safety guidelines and laboratory training. Public Health Rep 106:727, 1991.

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37. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Draft guidelines for isolation precautions for hospitals: I. Evolution of isolation practices, and II. Recommendations for isolation precautions in hospitals: Notice of comment period. Fed Reg 59:55552, 1995.

38. Lemon SM: Type A viral hepatitis: Epidemiology, diagnosis, and prevention. Clin Chem 43:1494, 1997.

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40. Lemon SM, Thomas DL: Vaccines to prevent viral hepatitis. N Engl J Med 336:196, 1997.

41. Alter MJ, Mast EE: The epidemiology of viral hepatitis in the United States. Gastroenterol Clin North Am 23:437, 1994.

42. Gitlin N: Hepatitis B: Diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. Clin Chem 43:1500, 1997.

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44. McQuillan GM, Alter MJ, Moyer LA, et al: A population-based serologic study of hepatitis C virus infection in the United States, in Rizzetto M, Purcell RH, Gerin JL, Verme G (eds): Viral Hepatitis and Liver Disease. Turin, Edizioni Minerva Medica, 1997, pp 267-270.

45. Alter MJ, Mast EE, Moyer LA, et al: Hepatitis C. Infect Dis Clin North Am 12:13, 1998.

46. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Recommendations for prevention and control of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and HCV-related chronic disease. MMWR 47:1, 1998.

47. Alter MJ: Epidemiology of hepatitis C. Hepatology 26:62, 1997.

48. Thomas DL, Factor SH, Kelen GD, et al: Viral hepatitis in health care personnel at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Arch Intern Med 153:1705, 1993.

49. Cooper VW, Krusell A, Tilton RC, et al: Seroprevalence of antibodies to hepatitis C virus in high-risk hospital personnel. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 13:82, 1992.

50. Panlilio AL, Shapiro CN, Schable CA, et al: Serosurvey of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus infection among hospital-based surgeons. J Am Coll Surg 180:16, 1995.

51. Shapiro CN, Tokars JI, Chamberland ME: American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons Serosurvey Study Committee: Use of hepatitis B vaccine and infection with hepatitis B and C among orthopaedic surgeons. J Bone Joint Surg 78A:1791, 1996.

52. Thomas DL, Gruninger SE, Siew C, et al: Occupational risk of hepatitis C infections among general dentists and oral surgeons in North America. Am J Med 100:41, 1996.

53. Alter MJ: The epidemiology of acute and chronic hepatitis C. Clin Liver Dis 1:559, 1997.

54. London WT, Evans AA: The epidemiology of hepatitis viruses B, C, and D. Clin Lab Med 16:251, 1996.

55. Tepper ML, Gully PR: Viral hepatitis: Know your D, E, F, Gs. Can Med Assoc J 156:1735, 1997.

56. Feucht HH, Zollner B, Polywka S, et al: Vertical transmission of hepatitis G. Lancet 347:615, 1996.

57. Alter MJ, Gallagher M, Morris TT, et al: Acute non-A-E hepatitis in the United States and the role of hepatitis G virus infection. N Engl J Med 336:741, 1997.

58. DeCock KM, Adjorlolo G, Ekpini E, et al: Epidemiology and transmission of HIV-2: Why there is no HIV-2 pandemic. JAMA 270:2083, 1993.

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61. Tokars JI, Marcus R, Culver DH, et al: Surveillance of HIV infection and zidovudine use among health care workers after occupational exposure to HIV-infected blood. Ann Intern Med 118:913, 1993.

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63. Bradford WZ, Daley CL: Multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis. Infect Dis Clin North Am 12:157, 1998.

64. Abernathy RS: Tuberculosis: An update. Pediatr Rev 18:50, 1997.

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66. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Tuberculosis morbidity: United States, 1996. MMWR 46:695, 1997.

67. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Tuberculosis morbidity: United States, 1997. MMWR 47:253, 1998.

68. Demangone D, Karras D: The clinical challenge of tuberculosis: A state-of-the-art review of diagnostic strategies, atypical presentations, and treatment guidelines for the emergency physician. Emerg Med Rep 18:235, 1997.

69. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Measles, mumps, and rubella: Vaccine use and strategies for elimination of measles, rubella, and congenital rubella syndrome and control of mumps: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). MMWR 47:1, 1998.

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74. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Prevention of varicella: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). MMWR 45:1, 1996.

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76. Preblud SR: Varicella: Complications and costs. Pediatrics 78:728, 1986.

77. Garner JS: Guideline for isolation precautions in hospitals. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 17:53, 1996.

78. Josephson A, Gombert ME: Airborne transmission of nosocomial varicella from isolated zoster. J Infect Dis 158:238, 1988.

79. Straus SE, Ostrove JM, Inchauspe G, et al: Varicella zoster virus infections: Proceedings of the National Institutes of Health Conference, 1987 Feb 18, Bethesda, Md. Ann Intern Med 108:221, 1988.

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81. Stover BH, Bratcher DF: Varicella zoster virus: Infection control and prevention. Am J Infect Control 26:369, 1998.

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83. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics: FASTATS Influenza: General Information: National Center for Infectious Disease. Atlanta, June 4, 1998.

84. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Prevention and control of influenza: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (APIC). MMWR 47:1, 1998.

85. Rasmussen JE: Scabies. Pediatr Rev 15:110, 1994.

86. Molinaro MJ, Schwartz RA, Janniger CK: Scabies. Cutis 56:317, 1995.

87. Sterling GB, Janniger CK, Kihiczak G, et al: Scabies. Am Fam Physician 46:1237, 1992.

88. Sirera G, Ruis F, Romeru J, et al: Hospital outbreak of scabies stemming from two AIDS patients with Norwegian scabies. Lancet 335:1227, 1990.

89. Schlesinger I, Oelrich DM, Tyring SK: Crusted (Norwegian) scabies in patients with AIDS: The range of clinical presentations. South Med J 87:352, 1994.

90. Kelly KJ, Walsh-Kelly CM: Latex allergy: A patient and health care system emergency. Ann Emerg Med 32:723, 1998.

91. Fisher A: Allergic contact reactions in health personnel. J Allergy Clin Immunol 90:729, 1992.

92. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Latex Allergy: A Prevention Guide. Publication 98-113. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Atlanta, 1998.

93. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Preventing Allergic Reactions to Natural Rubber Latex in the Workplace. Publication 97-135. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Atlanta, 1997.

94. Dallas County Hospital District: Latex allergy, in Parkland Health and Hospital System Safety Manual. 1998, draft policy, section S, pp 1-5.

95. University of North Carolina Hospitals: Latex allergy, in UNC Hospital's Latex Allergy Policy. 1995, pp 1-2.

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