Pectoralis Minor

Description o

The pectoralis minor muscle free flap was originally described in 1982 for facial reani- ยง

mation (53). The muscle is flat and thin with several muscular slips taking origin from @

Figure 30 Blood supply to the rectus muscle. Note the deep inferior epigastric vessels (arrow) entering the undersurface of the inferior aspect of the rectus muscle. The lateral aspect of the rectus muscle is slightly retracted to expose the vasculature.

Figure 31 Transverse rectus abdominis flap. Note that the flap is primarily subcutaneous fat and skin. One or two periumbilical perforators supply the entire flap including the large portion extending over the midline. As with all musculocutaneous rectus flaps, only a small segment of the anterior rectus sheath need be sacrificed: just enough to accommodate the vascular perforators.

Figure 31 Transverse rectus abdominis flap. Note that the flap is primarily subcutaneous fat and skin. One or two periumbilical perforators supply the entire flap including the large portion extending over the midline. As with all musculocutaneous rectus flaps, only a small segment of the anterior rectus sheath need be sacrificed: just enough to accommodate the vascular perforators.

Figure 32 Orientation of long skin paddle for rectus flap. It is oriented vertically along a line from the lateral border of the muscle (five-pointed star) to the tip of the scapula (four-pointed star).

the third through the fifth ribs and converging to insert onto the coracoid process of the scapula. The muscular slips are 10-14 cm long in the adult and 6-10 cm in the child. Cross-facial nerve grafting is usually required several months prior to flap transfer.

How To Reduce Acne Scarring

How To Reduce Acne Scarring

Acne is a name that is famous in its own right, but for all of the wrong reasons. Most teenagers know, and dread, the very word, as it so prevalently wrecks havoc on their faces throughout their adolescent years.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment