Sanitation Procedure

The principal stages involved in a typical sanitation procedure are as follows:

1. Preparation. Dismantle equipment as far as is practicable or necessary and/or remove unwanted utensils/equipment. Protect electric or other sensitive systems and/or screen off other lines or areas to prevent transfer of debris by the sanitation process.

2. Gross soil removal. Where appropriate, remove all loose or gross soil by eg, brushing, shoveling, scraping, or vacuuming. Wherever possible, soil on floors and walls should be picked up rather than washed to drains.

3. Prerinse. Rinse with low pressure cold water to remove loose small debris. Hot water can be used for fatty soils, but too high a temperature may coagulate proteins.

4. Cleaning. Apply cleaning chemicals, temperature, and mechanical energy to remove adhered soils.

5. Interrinse. Rinse with low pressure cold water to remove soil detached by cleaning operations and cleaning chemical residues.

6. Disinfection. Apply chemical disinfectants to remove or reduce the viability of remaining microorganisms to as low a level as possible.

7. Postrinse. Rinse with low pressure cold water to remove disinfectant residues if required.

8. Intercycle conditions. Remove excess water and/or do everything necessary to prevent the growth of mi-

Number of periodic cleans

Figure 3. Build up of soil and/or microorganisms A, with periodic cleans and B, without periodic cleans (19).

Number of periodic cleans

Figure 3. Build up of soil and/or microorganisms A, with periodic cleans and B, without periodic cleans (19).

croorganisms in the period up until the next production process or the next use of the equipment/area.

Although broadly similar for all general sanitation procedures, alternatives may be used. In CIP systems a second cleaning cycle may be added if both an alkaline and acidic phase are incorporated. With only light soiling to be removed, it may be appropriate to combine stages 4—6 by using a detergent-sanitizer, a chemical with both cleaning and antimicrobial properties. This should only be used for light soils, however, as with normal or heavy soils the antimicrobial properties will be quickly lost. Stages 3, 5, and 7 may be omitted in dry cleaning operations where organic solvents replace water in the cleaning and, where appropriate, the disinfection stages. Because of the general nature of this article, specialist dry cleaning is not discussed further.

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