Problems

1. Simulated Vinegar One way to make vinegar (not the preferred way) is to prepare a solution of acetic acid, the sole acid component of vinegar, at the proper pH (see Fig. 2-15) and add appropriate flavoring agents. Acetic acid (Mr 60) is a liquid at 25 °C, with a density of 1.049 g/mL. Calculate the volume that must be added to distilled water to make 1 L of simulated vinegar (see Fig. 2-16).

2. Acidity of Gastric HCl In a hospital laboratory, a 10.0 mL sample of gastric juice, obtained several hours after a meal, was titrated with 0.1 m NaOH to neutrality; 7.2 mL of NaOH was required. The patient's stomach contained no ingested food or drink, thus assume that no buffers were present. What was the pH of the gastric juice?

3. Measurement of Acetylcholine Levels by pH Changes The concentration of acetylcholine (a neuro-transmitter) in a sample can be determined from the pH changes that accompany its hydrolysis. When the sample is incubated with the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, acetyl-choline is quantitatively converted into choline and acetic acid, which dissociates to yield acetate and a hydrogen ion:

Nutrition For Kids

Nutrition For Kids

Get All The Support And Guidance You Need To Get The Right Nutrition For Your Kids. This Book Is One Of The Most Valuable Resources In The World When It Comes To Essential Nutrients For Children All Parents Should Know. Children today are more likely to consume foods that are delicious rather than nutritious, and most foods that come under the delicious category are usually either highly sweetened or salted, either way the delicious choice is not good for the child at all.

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