The Structure of DNA Allows for Its Replication and Repair with Near Perfect Fidelity

The capacity of living cells to preserve their genetic material and to duplicate it for the next generation results from the structural complementarity between the two halves of the DNA molecule (Fig. 1-30). The basic unit of DNA is a linear polymer of four different monomeric subunits, deoxyribonucleotides, arranged in a precise linear sequence. It is this linear sequence that encodes the genetic information. Two of these polymeric strands are twisted about each other to form the DNA double helix, in which each deoxyribonucleotide in one strand pairs specifically with a complementary deoxyribonu-cleotide in the opposite strand. Before a cell divides, the two DNA strands separate and each serves as a template for the synthesis of a new complementary strand, generating two identical double-helical molecules, one for each daughter cell. If one strand is damaged, continuity of information is assured by the information present in the other strand, which acts as a template for repair of the damage.

Diabetes 2

Diabetes 2

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin a hormone made by the pancreas to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use. Learn more...

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