Shideler n3 women 10 cycles

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FIG. 5. This three-part figure summarizes prospective data on ovulation disturbances during the perimenopause. The top section shows the proportion of three women experiencing three consecutive cycles that are normal (open bar) or showed ovulation disturbances (short luteal phase [SLP] and/or anovulatory in black). MetcalPs data in women with irregular cycles are shown on the left (n = 58) and on the right prospective data for 3—4 consecutive cycles in three women (see Fig. 4). The middle portion of the diagram shows prospective data drawn as percentage of ovulatory (open bar, [includes SLP for Shideler data]) and anovulatory cycles (black bar). The bottom panel shows the percentage of sera with luteal levels of progesterone (Luteal Levels Prog, open bar) or low progesterone levels (Low Prog, black bar) during the 72— 61 versus 6—0 months before the final menstrual flow from Rannevik data. mo, months. All data redrawn from published work (Metcalf 1979, Shideler et al 1989, Brown 1985, Rannevik et al 1995).

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72-61

mo before final menstrual flow (Rannevik 1995)

FIG. 5. This three-part figure summarizes prospective data on ovulation disturbances during the perimenopause. The top section shows the proportion of three women experiencing three consecutive cycles that are normal (open bar) or showed ovulation disturbances (short luteal phase [SLP] and/or anovulatory in black). MetcalPs data in women with irregular cycles are shown on the left (n = 58) and on the right prospective data for 3—4 consecutive cycles in three women (see Fig. 4). The middle portion of the diagram shows prospective data drawn as percentage of ovulatory (open bar, [includes SLP for Shideler data]) and anovulatory cycles (black bar). The bottom panel shows the percentage of sera with luteal levels of progesterone (Luteal Levels Prog, open bar) or low progesterone levels (Low Prog, black bar) during the 72— 61 versus 6—0 months before the final menstrual flow from Rannevik data. mo, months. All data redrawn from published work (Metcalf 1979, Shideler et al 1989, Brown 1985, Rannevik et al 1995).

FIG. 6. Diagram contrasting 14 consecutive cycles in one ovulatory woman during 1985—1986 and 1994—1995 showing cycle length (open bars) and luteal phase lengths (black) using quantitative basal temperature analysis with least mean squares statistics (Prior et al 1990b). The normal luteal phase length of 10 days is virtually consistent in the earlier years but is never present despite 86% continued ovulatory cycles when she experienced vasomotor symptoms and sleep disturbances although remained in phase B of perimenopause.

FIG. 6. Diagram contrasting 14 consecutive cycles in one ovulatory woman during 1985—1986 and 1994—1995 showing cycle length (open bars) and luteal phase lengths (black) using quantitative basal temperature analysis with least mean squares statistics (Prior et al 1990b). The normal luteal phase length of 10 days is virtually consistent in the earlier years but is never present despite 86% continued ovulatory cycles when she experienced vasomotor symptoms and sleep disturbances although remained in phase B of perimenopause.

experiential and clinical consequences as well as genetic background of perimenopausal ovulation disturbances need to be systematically documented in prospective studies.

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