Info

30 msec I 100 msec

Lights Tones Patient

Tones Controls

Figure 1 Simple reaction times to tone and light stimuli for the patient (left) and for tones for control subjects at the same intensity above threshold (right). Reaction times were slow for the patient when 30-msec tones were used, whereas changing the duration of light stimuli had only a minor effect. Control subjects have similar reaction times for both 30- and 100-msec tone durations. [From Buchtel and Stewart (1989). Auditory agnosia: Apperceptive or associative disorder? Brain Language 37, 12-25].

agnosia that were attributed to an associative deficit may also have involved a disruption of lower level language decoding functions.

Figure 2 Gap detection: The patient needed almost 300 msec between two 30-msec tones before he could reliably tell that there were two stimuli rather than one. Sensitivity to successive light stimuli was normal. [From Buchtel and Stewart (1989). Auditory agnosia: Apperceptive or associative disorder? Brain Language 37, 12-25].

Figure 2 Gap detection: The patient needed almost 300 msec between two 30-msec tones before he could reliably tell that there were two stimuli rather than one. Sensitivity to successive light stimuli was normal. [From Buchtel and Stewart (1989). Auditory agnosia: Apperceptive or associative disorder? Brain Language 37, 12-25].

See Also the Following Articles

AUDITORY CORTEX • AUDITORY PERCEPTION • HEARING • LANGUAGE AND LEXICAL PROCESSING • LANGUAGE DISORDERS • SENSORY DEPRIVATION • SPEECH • TEMPORAL LOBES

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