Knowledgebased Memory System

Within the knowledge-based memory system, it has been demonstrated that in animals and humans (i) the posterior parietal cortex supports memory for spatial attributes; (ii) the dorsal and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and/or anterior cingulate support memory for temporal attributes; (iii) the premotor, supplementary motor, and cerebellum in monkeys and humans and precentral cortex and cerebellum in rats support memory for response attributes; (iv) the orbital prefrontal cortex supports memory for reward value (affect) attributes; and (v) the inferotemporal cortex in monkeys and humans and TE2 cortex in rats subserve memory for sensory-perceptual attributes (e.g., visual objects) (Fig. 2).

Evidence supportive of the previously mentioned mapping of attributes onto specific brain regions is based in part on the use of paradigms that measure the perceptual memory process based on performance within a repetition priming or a discrimination performance paradigm, the attention process by measuring performance within selective attention and stimulus-binding tasks, and the long-term storage and retrieval process by measuring learning and retention in a variety of behavioral tasks. Due to of space constraints, I discuss only the role of the parietal cortex in processing spatial information and that of the inferotemporal cortex in processing visual object information.

Attribute

Language

Time

Place

Response

Sensory-Perception Reward Value (Affect) e.g. Visual Object

Attribute

Language

Time

Place

Response

Sensory-Perception Reward Value (Affect) e.g. Visual Object

Key: M=Monkeys, H=Humans, R=Rats

Figure 2 Representation of the neural substrates, features, and process characteristics associated with the knowledge-based memory system for the language, time, place, response, reward value (affect), and sensory-perception attributes.

Key: M=Monkeys, H=Humans, R=Rats

Figure 2 Representation of the neural substrates, features, and process characteristics associated with the knowledge-based memory system for the language, time, place, response, reward value (affect), and sensory-perception attributes.

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