Diagnosis

The diagnosis of MS is based on the clinical features of the illness. There is no one definitive test for MS. Signs and symptoms define lesions that develop over time (at least 1 month apart) and space (different areas of the central nervous system). Most symptoms tend to develop over several days and then persist for several weeks to months, with improvement and in many cases return to normal. The neurologic examination generally provides objective evidence of the patient's symptoms, however, sensory symptoms may be entirely subjective. Paraclinical data, which include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and evoked potentials (EPs), are used to confirm or dispute the clinical diagnosis. The most recent criteria were developed by an International panel of experts in the field MS (Table I), These criteria incorporate MRI as a tool of assessing subclinical disease activity and providing for a diagnosis before a second clinical event. The criteria includes visual

Table I

MS Diagnostic Criteria0

Table I

MS Diagnostic Criteria0

Clinical attacks

Objective lesions

Additional requirements to make diagnosis

2 or more

2 or more

None

2 or more

All About Alzheimers

All About Alzheimers

The comprehensive new ebook All About Alzheimers puts everything into perspective. Youll gain insight and awareness into the disease. Learn how to maintain the patients emotional health. Discover tactics you can use to deal with constant life changes. Find out how counselors can help, and when they should intervene. Learn safety precautions that can protect you, your family and your loved one. All About Alzheimers will truly empower you.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment