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FIGURE 5.2 Examples of how a range of different temporal stimuli are represented in memory according to scalar timing theory. Temporal stimuli are shown in the left-hand panels and their associated memory representations in the right-hand panels. In all panels, probability is shown on the y-axis and the duration of the interval on the x-axis. In generating the memory representations, a coefficient of variation of 30% in the perception of the interval was assumed. (a) A fixed interval of 5 sec. (b) A fixed interval of 10 sec. (c) A variable interval that has an equal probability of being 5 or 10 sec. (d) A variable interval that has an equal probability of being 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, or 10 sec. In panels (c) and (d) the overall memory representation of the mixture is indicated by the bold line, and the representations of the individual intervals of which it is the sum are indicated by the thinner lines. Note that due to the constant coefficient of variation, the longer an interval, the less precisely it is represented; i.e., the scalar property applies. As a result of the scalar property, the memory representations for variable intervals are asymmetrical and skewed to the right.

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