Uses of Reproductive Cloning

What uses might there be, or what reasons might someone have, for producing a human being through cloning What follows is a survey of a number of possible uses of this procedure, some of which are obviously more problematic than others. The ethical issues that have been or might be raised regarding the possible uses of reproductive cloning will then be discussed. One of the probable primary uses, if cloning does become a reality, is for the treatment of fertility problems. For example, if the...

Ongoing Ethical Concerns in the Practice of Behavior Therapy

Ethical practice has been a priority among behavior therapists. Nonetheless, concerns continue to arise. Particularly in cases where, at least potentially, the application of a technique can inflict pain, or where clients are relatively powerless or are involuntarily the subject of treatment, areas of ethical concern still remain. USE OF AVERSION PROCEDURES. The use of aversion procedures the application of subjectively unpleasant stimulation contingent upon performance of an undesirable...

Ethical Issues in Grief

Ethical issues in grief may emerge from three sources. First are general issues for counselors. Grieving persons can be highly vulnerable. Counselors have to have personal integrity and follow the ethical standards of their profession, including maintaining confidentiality, preventing harm to the client or others, assuring competence, and upholding standards of professional behavior. Counselors should familiarize themselves with their respective codes of ethics. They may wish to review as well...

The Role of Alcoholics Anonymous

Despite the widespread acceptance of the disease concept, the leading approach to overcoming alcoholism in the United States is, ironically, not a medical treatment but a self-help program based on principles of moral and spiritual renewal. Founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson, an alcoholic stockbroker, Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) borrowed many of its ideas from an evangelical Christian movement known as the Oxford Group. Though it embraces the disease concept as part of its holistic view of alcoholism...

The Concept Of Selfwilled Death In Hinduism

According to the traditional law books, funeral rituals were not to be performed for those who died in unnatural ways. This may have been used as a deterrent against suicide the Hindu tradition disapproved of suicide, which was defined as killing oneself because of depression, passion, or uncontrollable circumstance. But unnatural death was not always viewed negatively death by violence (war, murder, or accident) was viewed as powerful, leading to heaven or deification. The type of unnatural...

Reproduction in Hindu Religious

Although Hinduism recognizes a final stage of life in which the individual is released from domestic and social obligations in order to be able to pursue enlightenment (moksha), in the earlier, householder stage, detailed rules define acceptable behavior. Among the most important are those that regulate reproduction. The intent of these rules is to maintain the hereditary caste distinctions. Here Hinduism's outlook is very similar to that of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Western...

Ontological and Moral Status of the Fetus

The question of the ontological status of the fetus can be teased apart from the question of moral status, but in the abortion debate, fetal personhood and the possession of moral rights are often assumed to go hand in hand. The term person, however, is ambiguous, having a legal, a descriptive, and a normative sense. To be a legal person is simply to possess legal rights. In Roe v. Wade 1973 , the Supreme Court held that fetuses are not persons as defined by the 14th Amendment of the...