Enzyme classification

Most enzymes have names that end in the suffix -ase. The first part of the name often gives an indication of the substrate; for example, urease and pyruvate decarboxylase. Other enzymes have names that are less helpful, such as trypsin, and others have several alternative names to confuse the issue further. To resolve such problems, an internationally agreed system of nomenclature has been devised. All enzymes are assigned initially to one of six broad groups according to the type of reaction they carry out, as shown in Table 6.1. Each enzyme is then placed into successively more specific groupings, each with a number. Thus regardless of any colloquial or alternative names, each enzyme has its own unique and unambiguous four-figure Enzyme Commission 'signature' (pyruvate decarboxylase, mentioned above, is EC 4.1.1.1).

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Diabetes 2

Diabetes 2

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin a hormone made by the pancreas to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use. Learn more...

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