The Disease

Rotavirus diarrhea is as highly prevalent in developed as in developing countries, and all children have been infected by 2 years of age. It is responsible for from 20% to 60% of cases of infantile gastroenteritis that require hospitaliza-tion and for up to 40% in community-based studies.[2] In temperate countries it peaks in winter or early spring, whereas in sub-Saharan Africa peaks coincide with dry seasons.[1] Infection is transmitted feco-orally, and after a short incubation period (2-3 days) patients present with acute dehydrating watery diarrhea sometimes with vomiting. Illness lasts on average 5-6 days but prolonged rotavirus excretion can occur after severe disease occasionally with relapses of diarrhea. Extraintestinal disease including acute myositis, hemophagocytic lymphohistio-cytosis, aseptic meningitis, and encephalitis has been described rarely.[1] Of particular interest has been the recent detection of rotavirus viremia which might be linked to such extraintestinal infection.[12]

Diagnosis

Laboratory diagnosis depends upon detection of the virus, its antigens, or genome in the feces of infected patients.

Table 6 Primers used for VP7 (G) typing

Primer

Strain

Serotype

Getting Started With Dumbbells

Getting Started With Dumbbells

The use of dumbbells gives you a much more comprehensive strengthening effect because the workout engages your stabilizer muscles, in addition to the muscle you may be pin-pointing. Without all of the belts and artificial stabilizers of a machine, you also engage your core muscles, which are your body's natural stabilizers.

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