Psilotum

Psilotum (hairless) is a genus with only two species. In nature they spread across the South Pacific, Hawaii, and Africa, and in escaped colonies they are found in the U.S. Southeast and

Polystichum aculeatum X P. proliferum in the Peters garden.

Polystichum aculeatum X P. munitum in the Förster garden. Photo by Richie Steffen, Miller Botanical Garden.

Polystichum aculeatum X P. proliferum in the Peters garden.

Polystichum aculeatum X P. munitum in the Förster garden. Photo by Richie Steffen, Miller Botanical Garden.

comparably inviting habitats. With their unusual "unfernlike" structure, they are not immediately recognized as ferns, but offer conversation-worthy additions to collections.

Psilotum nudum (hairless and naked, a bit redundant), the whisk fern, is an oddity that stretches the imagination when called a fern, but a fern it is. It features slender twigs of branching upright "whisks" without true roots or the traditional leafy adornment associated with fronds. Fertile portions are dotted with pinhead-sized triads of spore-bearing yellow pearls that are the fern's reproductive mechanism. They distribute the spores for a later, and frequently unexpected, emergence from underground incubation. This tropical species is abundant in various habitats both terrestrial and epiphytic (an unusual pairing). Visitors to Hawaii should look for it in the most unanticipated places from full sun near lava flows to elegant hotel gardens. In cultivation it is undemanding (and often inconspicuous) indoors, or, when it makes an appearance, outdoors in Zones 9 to 11. Japanese specialists have selected many cultivars.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
600 Chocolate Recipes

600 Chocolate Recipes

Within this in cookbook full of chocolate recipes you will find over 600 Chocolate Recipes For Chocolate Lovers.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment