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a Fatty acid concentrations expressed as g/100 g edible portion. Numbers in parentheses are the percentage of total fatty acid content.

a Fatty acid concentrations expressed as g/100 g edible portion. Numbers in parentheses are the percentage of total fatty acid content.

Source: Adapted from USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 19 (Nutrient Data Laboratory Home Page, http://www.ars.usda.gov/nutrientdata).

deboned chicken muscle, the proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids (especially oleic acid) is higher than in hand-deboned chicken muscle. The increase in oleic acid is most likely due to the increase in triacylglycerol concentration.

G. Processed Poultry Products

In recent years, an increasing number of processed poultry products have become available to consumers. The purpose of this section is not to cover all processed poultry products but to give examples of products that represent the processing techniques used on a variety of poultry meats.

Canned poultry meats are cooked at high temperature in broth. Therefore, both total fat concentration and fatty acid composition (see Table 7.1) are similar to those of stewed meats. Canned chicken is slightly higher in monounsaturated fatty acids than stewed chicken owing to the retention of triacylglycerols in the broth of these products. Poultry meat is also marketed as boneless rolls that are produced by restructuring processes that use a combination of sodium chloride and phosphate salts to bind together whole or coarsely cutup meat pieces (Addis, 1986). These products are often marketed as ready-to-cook roasts and luncheon meats. The total fat concentration of chicken and turkey rolls made from light meat is higher than in cooked muscle without skin but lower than in cooked muscle with skin (Table 7.15). This is because skin or separable fat is included in these products and/or less fat is lost during the cooking process. The fatty acid compositions of chicken and turkey rolls are similar to those of cooked chicken and turkey light muscle with skin.

Numerous cured poultry products are available to consumers, including frankfurters and luncheon meats. The fat and fatty acid contents of these products are dependent on the type of meat used in the formulation. Chicken frankfurters contain 19.48% fat and have a fatty acid profile that contains more monounsaturated and less saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids than either chicken light or dark muscle (Table 7.16). The increase in the proportion of monounsaturated fatty

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