Q

QUANTA, LAW OF. See NEURAL QUANTUM THEORY.

QUANTAL HYPOTHESIS. See NEURAL QUANTUM THEORY.

QUANTITATIVE LEARNING THEORY.

See ESTES' STIMULUS SAMPLING THEORY.

QUANTITATIVE THEORY OF CUTANEOUS SENSITIVITY. See NAFE'S VASCULAR THEORY OF CUTANEOUS SENSITIVITY.

QUANTUM THEORY. See VISION/ SIGHT, THEORIES OF.

QUESTION METHOD/PHENOMENON.

See PSYCHOPATHOLOGY, THEORIES OF.

laughter, and Cicero focuses on the use of ridicule in rhetoric, whereas Quintilian 's theory of humor is of interest because it represents the first attempt to produce a psychological analysis of the effects of laughter. See also ARISTOTLE'S THEORY OF HUMOR; CICERO'S HUMOR THEORY; GREIG'S THEORY OF LAUGHTER; HUMOR, THEORIES OF; PIDDINGTON'S COMPENSATORY HUMOR THEORY. REFERENCES

Quintilian, M. F. (1714/1821-1825). De insti-tutione oratoria. London: Heinemann/Paris: Lamaire. Greig, J. Y. T. (1923/1969). The psychology of laughter and comedy. New York: Dodd, Mead/Cooper Square. Piddington, R. (1933/1963). The psychology of laughter: A study in social adaptation. London: Figurehead/New York: Gamut.

QUOTA OF AFFECT. See CONSTANCY, PRINCIPLE OF.

QUOTIENT HYPOTHESIS. See WEBER'S LAW.

QUINTILIAN'S THEORY OF HUMOR.

The Roman rhetorician Quintilian (c. 35-96 A.D.) - like both Cicero and Aristotle - embraces the theories/aspects of the "deformity" and the "baseness" in humor in his theoretical approach. Quintilian's theory of humor/laughter proposes that laughter is always associated with something low ("humile") that may take any of six forms: urbanity, gracefulness, piquancy, pleasantry, jesting, or verbal attacks. In concert with Cicero, Quintilian calls attention to those laughs that arise from surprise ("the happiest jokes of all"), the laughs from the deceit and defeat of expectation, and the laughs that are involved in situations where the turning of another person's words express a meaning not originally intended by the speaker. Quintilian suggests that the rhetorical value of humor resides in its ability to "dissipate melancholy," to "unbend the mind" in intense situations, and to "gain renewed strength" following excesses or fatigue. According to R. Piddington, Plato and Aristotle place emphasis on the ethical implications of

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