The Basis Of Informed Consent

Informed consent is an effort to ensure that the trust required of the patient is truly justified, the power of the therapist is not abused intentionally or accidentally, and the caring of the therapist is expressed in ways that the patient clearly understands and agrees to. Case law has provided a clear analysis of the basis and workings of informed consent. Much of this case law has concerned medical practice, but the relevance (not always complete) of the principles to clinical assessment...

Emotional Competence For Therapy Knowing Oneself

Emotional competence for therapy, as described by Pope and Brown 1996 , reflects therapists' acknowledgment and respect for themselves as unique, fallible human beings. It involves self-knowledge, self-acceptance, and self-monitoring. Therapists must know their own emotional strengths and weaknesses, their needs and resources, the abilities and limits for doing clinical work. Psychotherapy often provides the occasion for strong emotional reactions for both therapist and client. To the degree...

Mistaking Deductive Validity for Truth

This fallacy takes the form of assuming that because an argument is a logical syllogism, the conclusion must be true. It ignores the possibility that the premises of the argument may be false. Example I just read a book that proves that that book's author can have sex with his clients without causing any harm. He has done research with his own clients, kept careful records, and even interviewed them. His statistical analysis shows that the clients he has sex with are no worse off and some may...