Diverticula Abnormal Gastric Contents

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■ Diverticula

Gastric diverticula are uncommon. Most are subcardial, and a smaller percentage are found in the antrum; other sites are rare. Very rare but possible complications are ulceration and hemorrhage. The diagnosis is usually incidental.

Endoscopy demonstrates a round or oval orifice, occasionally with a projecting fold (Fig. 3.131)

Abnormal Gastric Contents

Gastroscopy will occasionally reveal coatings on the gastric mucosa that are initially difficult to identify. Frequently they consist of drug or food residues (Fig. 3.132). Food residues are found in patients who have not been adequately prepared for endoscopy. They are also seen in association with motility disorders and, of course, obstructions.

When endoscopy is performed late in the day, considerably more resting juice is found than in the morning. Bile reflux from the pylorus is sometimes seen, generally as an incidental finding (Fig. 3.132 e).

Fig. 3.131 Gastric diverticulum
e Bile reflux

This section concludes with a review of several interesting findings in the stomach, some of which are not commonly seen (Fig. 3.133).

Fig. 3.133 Miscellaneous b Fistula formation in the pyloric region a Pancreatic pseudocyst. A drain has perforated into the stomach

Fig. 3.133 Miscellaneous b Fistula formation in the pyloric region a Pancreatic pseudocyst. A drain has perforated into the stomach

Pressure injury to the pyloric region from a feeding tube

d Bizarre appearance in a cascade stomach

e Suction artifacts

f Sharply demarcated area of intestinal metaplasia c

3.3 Pathological Findings: Duodenum

Duodenal Diverticula - 140

Duodenal Ulcer: Complications - 135

Duodenal Ulcer: Complications - 135

Polypoid Lesions in the Duodenum - 137

Polypoid Lesions in the Duodenum Diagnosis - 138

Sprue, Crohn Disease, and Whipple Disease - 139

Duodenal Diverticula - 140

Duodenal Changes Associated with Diseases in Adjacent Organs - 141

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