Overview of Pathological Findings in the Stomach

Fig. 3.72 Gastric ulcer

Table 3.9 Pathological findings in the stomach u TO

Table 3.9 Pathological findings in the stomach

Acute gastritis

Portal hypertension

Chronic gastritis

- Varices

Gastric ulcer

- Hypertensive gastropathy

Masses

Postoperative changes

- Extramural

- Total gastrectomy

- Intramural

- Partial gastrectomy

- Epithelial

- Vagotomy and pyloroplasty

Malignancies

- Fundoplication

- Carcinoma

Rare findings

- Lymphoma

Fig. 3.71 Chronic gastritis

Fig. 3.70 Acute gastritis

Fig. 3.71 Chronic gastritis

Fig. 3.72 Gastric ulcer

Fig. 3.73 Gastric polyp

Fig. 3.74 Gastric carcinoma

Fig. 3.73 Gastric polyp

Fig. 3.74 Gastric carcinoma

Fig. 3.75 Fundic varices

Fig. 3.76 Billroth II gastroenterostomy ■ 96

Fig. 3.77 Angiodysplasias

Acute and chronic gastritis are reactions of the gastric mucosa to various noxious agents. They are entirely different conditions, each presenting its own clinical, endoscopic, and histological features (Table 3.10). Both conditions, especially the chronic form, pose a special challenge to the endoscopist because the endoscopic findings correlate very poorly with the histological findings and clinical presentation.

Table 3.10 Basic forms of gastritis

► Erosive and hemorrhagic gastritis (acute gastritis)

► Chronic gastritis

► Special forms (specific gastritides)

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