Introduction

Contemporary history is unfortunately associated with pandemic civilian disasters that have made the concept of mass casualty events highly and painfully relevant for all medical and surgical specialties.

Catastrophic events resulting in mass casualties are typically associated with a number of victims that exceeds the available medical resources. Besides the sheer number of victims involved, the severity of injuries tends to be high and complex and there are usually other factors involved that further complicate the situation. These events are always unexpected and result in chaos and confusion on site and among the medical teams, with great numbers of anxious family members claiming their right for information on their loved ones and numerous patients without significant physical injuries suffering of post-traumatic reactions. In addition, the emotions of the medical personnel exposed to the results of disasters or terrorist attacks with inno cent civilian victims, often children and babies, are more than likely to influence their work. Therefore, the unique characteristics of these events require a different management approach compared to day-to-day emergency room trauma care. As in sporadic complicated trauma case management, a multidisciplinary team, composed of various surgical and medical specialists, is often involved. Under these circumstances, the need for a common language and for the understanding of mass casualty treatment principles is certainly a must for all the consultants involved. Terms such as "triage" and "damage control" should not be reserved merely for the lexicon of the general surgeons in the trauma team, but should be understood and applied by all those involved in the treatment of trauma patients.

The spectrum of urogenital trauma, including life-threatening conditions (such as high-grade renal injury) or injuries that carry the potential of severe late morbidity (such as ureteral or urethral trauma), put the urologic surgeon in a position that demands thorough knowledge of the modern principles of trauma, including preparedness to catastrophic situations with mass casualty scenarios.

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