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Data modified from McCance and Widdowson's (2002) The Composition of Foods, 6th Edition, Cambridge: Royal Society of Chemistry.

Data modified from McCance and Widdowson's (2002) The Composition of Foods, 6th Edition, Cambridge: Royal Society of Chemistry.

In the UK about 47% of dietary fiber is obtained from cereal products, including bread and breakfast cereals. The level of cell wall polysaccharides in a product made from flour depends on the extraction rate, which is the proportion of the original grain present in the flour after milling. Thus a 'white' flour with an extraction rate of 70% usually contains about 3% NSP, whereas a 'wholemeal' flour with an extraction rate of 100% contains about 10% NSP. The terms 'soluble' and 'insoluble' fiber have been coined in order to partially overcome the problem of the lack of correspondence between the total analytical value for fiber and the physical properties of the measured polysaccharides. By adopting the Englyst technique for the separation and chemical analysis of nonstarch polysaccharides it is possible to specify both the soluble and insoluble fiber content of foods. Some representative values for soluble and insoluble fiber in cereal foods are given in Table 3, and those for fruits and vegetables, which provide a further 45% of the fiber in UK diets, are given in Table 4.

Keep Your Weight In Check During The Holidays

Keep Your Weight In Check During The Holidays

A time for giving and receiving, getting closer with the ones we love and marking the end of another year and all the eating also. We eat because the food is yummy and plentiful but we don't usually count calories at this time of year. This book will help you do just this.

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